flu symptoms 2019 bc

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  • Des 05, 2019

Flu forecast 2019: Here
Flu forecast 2019: Here’s what to expect from this year’s flu …

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Influenza, also called the flu, is an infection of the channel upper airway which is caused by the influenza virus. Symptoms can include fever, headache, runny nose, sore throat, or cough. Every year there are periods of time where there is an outbreak of flu, it’s called flu season. Flu season generally occurs during the fall, winter and early spring. The influenza vaccine protects against viruses that cause influenza. To learn more about the flu and flu vaccine, and flu-related information from authorities access your health, visit our health feature.

Note: Live attenuated influenza vaccine (given as a nasal spray and is also known as LAIV or FluMist®) will not be available in Canada for (flu) influenza 2019/20 season.

Influenza (flu) is. People often use the term “flu” to describe any type of minor illnesses, such as colds or, who have flu-like symptoms. But the real flu is different. Flu symptoms are usually worse than the cooler and last longer. Flu does not usually cause vomiting or diarrhea in adults.

Most flu outbreaks happen in late fall and winter. Because symptoms may not start for a few days, you may pass the flu to someone before you know you have it.

flu is usually caused by influenza virus A and B. There are different strains of the flu virus every year.

flu causes fever, body aches, headache, dry cough, and a sore or dry throat. You may feel tired and less hungry than usual. Symptoms usually are the worst for the first three or four days. But it can take 1 to 2 weeks to get really good.

It usually takes 1-4 days to get flu symptoms after you have been around someone who has the virus.

Most people are better off without problems. But sometimes the flu can lead to bacterial infection, such as ,, or. Less frequently, the flu can lead to more serious problems, such as.

Certain people are at higher risk of problems from the flu. They include children, pregnant women, older adults, and people with long-term illnesses or with making it difficult to fight infection.

The doctor will ask about your symptoms and examine you. This usually gives the doctor enough information to find out if you have the flu, especially if many cases of a similar illness have occurred in the area and the local health unit reported a flu outbreak.

In some cases, the doctor may do a blood test or take a sample of fluid from the nose or throat to find out what kind of flu virus you have.

Most people can treat flu symptoms at home. home care includes rest, drinking plenty of fluids, and taking medicine to reduce fever. But some people need to go to hospital for treatment. They may have severe symptoms or get pneumonia. Or flu infection can make existing health problems worse.

If you think you have the flu, your doctor may be able to provide a drug that can make the symptoms milder. It’s best to start taking it within 2 days of your first symptoms.

You can help prevent the flu by getting a flu shot every year. It’s best to get the vaccine as soon as it is available. It comes as a shot or a spray that you breathe through your nose.

Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NaCl) recommend parents that everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine. The vaccine is very important for people at high risk of problems from flu, including:

The flu vaccine is also important for health care workers, who live or work with people who are at high risk of problems from the flu, and people who provide essential community services.

vaccine usually prevents most cases of flu. But even if you get the flu after you’ve vaccine, your symptoms will be milder and you will have less chance of problems from the flu. You can not get the flu from the flu vaccine.

Flu is caused by influenza viruses. general class of influenza virus is a type A and type B, each of which includes several subtypes or strains. Type A is usually responsible for annual outbreaks usually occur during the late fall and early winter.

The influenza virus changes frequently, so having the flu caused by one strain may not give full for other types.

This virus is spread fromperson to person through:

If you are infected with the flu, you are most likely to spread it to others from one day before symptoms start 5 days after the onset of symptoms. Children may be contagious for longer.

Symptoms usually develop 1-4 days after you are infected. , Because the symptoms do not develop for several days, you may pass the flu to someone before you know you have it

The symptoms of influenza (flu) appear suddenly and often include:

Some people infected with flu virus but not have any symptoms.

in children, influenza may also cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Other conditions have similar symptoms to flu, such as the common cold, bacterial infections, and infections.

Influenza (flu) usually comes on suddenly. In many cases one can determine the hours when symptoms began. Symptoms develop one to four days after you are infected, and they include:

Complete recovery may take 1 to 2 weeks or more. Fatigue and weakness can last for several weeks.

influenza can develop in anyone, but they are much more likely in older adults and people who have other health problems, especially heart disease and lung cancer.

Anyone with influenza (flu) virus can be infected. The virus is contagious and spreads easily among people in groups, such as in nursing homes, hospitals, shelters, schools, and day care. Work, visit or live in one of these fields increases your risk of developing flu

The risk of experiencing severe symptoms and higher for :.

Call 911 or other emergency services if:

Call your doctor if:

in most healthy people, the flu will disappear in 5 to 7 days, although fatigue could last much longer. Although you may feel very sick, home treatment is usually all that is needed. If the flu season, you might just want to treat your symptoms at home. Closely watch for, such as nasal drainage that changes from clear to colored after 5 to 7 days and symptoms return or get worse.

Early treatment with antiviral medications can reduce the severity of influenza and may prevent serious flu-related complications. The best thing is to start medication within 48 hours of onset of symptoms. Infants, older adults, and people who have chronic health problems are more likely to have complications from the flu, and they may need to see a doctor for treatment beyond the treatment at home. But not all antiviral drugs work against all strains of flu. Talk to your doctor if you think you may need antiviral medication.

Contact your doctor if you think your symptoms are caused by something other than the flu.

You, or your child can diagnose and treat the flu.

A doctor who specializes in treating infectious diseases may be required if the diagnosis is unclear or if severe complications develop.

The doctor can diagnose influenza (flu) using a symptom of your own if many cases of a similar illness have occurred in society and if the local health unit has confirmed an outbreak of flu

Tests confirm you have the flu and to know the type of virus may be important if :.

The test may involve blood tests (rarely used) or to identify the virus. Some cultures take 24 to 48 hours for results, so they will not help doctors decide whether to prescribe an antiviral medication. A rapid flu tests available that provide results in 30 minutes. While this test is not 100% accurate, it can be useful when deciding whether to use antiviral drugs. Rapid flu tests may not be available in all provinces.

In most healthy people, influenza (flu) will go away in 5 to 7 days. The worst symptoms usually last 3 to 4 days. home treatment to relieve symptoms and prevent complications are usually all that is needed.

But some people require hospitalization. They may have severe symptoms or get pneumonia. Or flu infection can make existing health problems worse

antiviral drugs can help :.

People who are at high risk of complications are advised to contact a doctor within 48 hours of their first symptoms to see if they needed drugs to shorten the illness. They also have to call a doctor to receive treatment if they have been exposed to the flu.

You can help prevent influenza by getting immunized with influenza vaccine every year as soon as available.

The annual immunization with inactivated influenza vaccine (flu shot) or norigin of infection spray flu vaccine prevents flu and its complications in most people.

Most healthy people ages 2 to 59 years can choose to get the nasal spray form of the vaccine (such as FluMist) is not a flu vaccination. Nasal spray vaccine contains live virus component, so should not be given to people who have long-term (chronic) health conditions. Close contacts of people at high risk categories can be given both types of vaccine, with one rare exception. Immunization with inactivated virus (flu shot) is preferred over nasal spray vaccine for both health care workers and close contacts of people with a weight during a time when the environment is protected needed. This is to avoid the risk of virus transmission from the active flu nasal spray vaccine. If the nasal spray vaccine is used, the contact with anyone in this high-risk group should be avoided for 14 days. For close contacts of people in all the other high-risk categories, vaccination with either the flu shot or nasal spray is considered safe.

You should not get the nasal spray if you:

Even if the flu vaccine does not prevent influenza, can reduce the severity of flu symptoms and reduce the risk. Studies have found that flu vaccination results in fewer days missed from work and fewer visits to the doctor for respiratory infections, and reduce the number of people who develop complications from the flu, such as. And the flu vaccine can help protect babies from women who received the vaccine while they are pregnant.

Despite these results, many people choose not to get the flu vaccine. Some did not get the vaccine because they believe about the flu or the vaccine. This includes the belief that influenza is a mild illness or that the vaccine causes the flu. The shots can cause side effects, such as pain or fever, but they are usually small and do not last long.

Although antiviral drugs sometimes prevent the flu, they do not work the same way as annual immunizations and should not replace the flu shot or the nasal spray vaccine dose.

person who gives the vaccine may tell you or your children do not get it if you or your child:

Because the nasal spray vaccine is more expensive than a flu shot, it may not be covered by the provincial health your plan or a private health insurance plan. Check with your provincial health unit or your city or a private insurance company.

Almost every community has a program that offers the flu vaccine during flu season. You can also get flu vaccines during routine visits to the doctor or pharmacy. Many health clinics have been set the clock at the start of the flu season for people to get a flu vaccine without the need to make an appointment

Increase your chances of staying healthy by :.

Two antiviral drugs (oseltamivir and zanamivir) can help prevent the flu is caused by influenza A and B viruses. These drugs also may reduce the length of the disease if they are given as soon as possible after the first symptoms or within 48 hours. During the flu pandemic, these medications can be given at the same time as the flu vaccine and for 2 weeks after a while your body produces to protect you from the virus. Influenza drugs are usually given to people who are very sick with the flu or to those who are likely to have complications from the flu. But they can also be used for people who have been sick with the flu for less than 48 hours. These drugs are taken by mouth (pills) or inhaled into the lungs (inhaler).

Drug antiviral amantadine has been used to prevent the flu is caused by influenza A. But for the last few years the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has doctors advise not to use this drug for treat or prevent flu. These drugs do not work against most types of flu viruses. Amantadine does not protect against influenza B. Be sure to talk with your doctor about the best medicine for you.

If you have influenza (flu), you can expect the disease to go it alone in about 7 to 10 days. In the meantime, you can take steps to feel better:

Call your doctor if:

Some antiviral drugs reduce the severity and shorten the duration of influenza (flu) symptoms by 1 to 1 ½ day if administered within 48 hours of the first symptoms. These medicines are not intended to substitute for getting a flu shot every year. In contrast, antiviral medicines can help control the outbreak and prevent the spread of infection, especially in people at flu complications.

antiviral drugs oseltamivir and zanamivir are used to prevent infections and influenza A and B treated. They can reduce the severity and shorten the duration of flu symptoms. Amantadine has been used to help prevent and treat flu caused by (but not influenza B) infection of influenza A. But for the past several years, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has advised doctors to do not use amantadine to treat or prevent flu. These drugs do not work against most types of flu viruses. It is important to talk with your doctor about the best medicine for you.

Two antiviral drugs, oseltamivir and zanamivir, can treat influenza A and B infection.

The effectiveness of antiviral drugs can vary from year to year. Some years drugs might not work against influenza virus types cause symptoms. Your doctor can help you decide whether antiviral drugs to help you.

Most people do not need antiviral drugs. They recover from influenza without.

But for most people who have a feel quite ill flu, some people may choose to take the medicine even if they are at low risk for complications.

You can not prevent the flu or make yourself feel better faster by taking:

Adaptation date:
07/11/2019

Adapted by:

HealthLink BC

Adaptation Reviewed By:
HealthLink BC

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Adaptation date:
07/11/2019

Adapted by:

HealthLink BC

Adaptation Reviewed By:
HealthLink BC

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